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Vape News In Brief: December 18th, 2017 Edition

Vape News In Brief: December 18th, 2017 Edition

 

 


VNIB is a semi-regular column in which we take a look around the globe, searching for news, science, and the occasional pop culture reference related to vaping and the life of vapers. Today, let's talk about…

 

 

…a new study out of Georgia State University that finds, wait for it, people who are more likely to trust authoritarian governments are less likely to believe vapor products are substantially less harmful than tobacco (this is a true statement). The study's author suggests that more research is needed in order to find a way to reach people who mistrust "authority voices" like the FDA and convince them to adopt the (untrue) narrative that e-cigarettes are as bad or worse than tobacco.

 


More from Georgia State - another report from the university suggests that restrictive vaping laws may increase the prevalence of smoking in pregnant women by as much as 30 percent. During pregnancy, many women are already highly motivated to quit smoking, but laws that draw no distinction between vaping and smoking may be a deterrent. We should note here that nicotine, regardless of whether it's derived from tobacco or not, is harmful to fetal development and that vaping nicotine e-liquids during a pregnancy is still not advised.

 

This will sting - a new bill under consideration in Canada's Ontario province would ban brick-and-mortar vape shops from displaying their products and from teaching customers how to use them. Even giving advice on a Facebook page would henceforth be verboten. Local retailers are (rightfully) saying that such a ban would make it essentially impossible to help people quit smoking by vaping, as every beginner needs at least a bit of guidance in choosing and maintaining a setup.

 

 

Cashing in – the *National Law Review* reports having found at least 150 private lawsuits against vapor companies operating in California for failing to abide by that state's Proposition 65 law, which requires many products sold in the state to advertise that they may contain chemicals known to cause cancer or reproductive harm, like nicotine. So far, nearly 100 cases have settled out of court, netting lawyers and their plaintiffs roughly $3.9 million in settlement loot.

 

 

 

 


 

In yet another sign that the tides are turning in favor of widespread acceptance of vaping as a legitimate harm reduction tool, the New York Times Health page has even come out with a lukewarm endorsement of the practice.

 

 

A doctor in Ottawa, Canada, has received a $100,000 grant to study whether vaping can be an effective tool in helping the region's homeless population quit smoking. In a country that's been generally even more hostile to vaping than the US, that's quite an accomplishment – and needed; while only nine percent of Ottawans as a whole smoke, that number jumps to 96 percent for inner-city homeless drug users.


Add this piece to the list of pro-vaping screeds aimed at a concise population – in this case, like the *Times* article cited above, the target is "old people." Key wisdom nugget: "One of the main reasons why vaping is considered so much safer than smoking is because it lacks the carcinogenic chemicals that are added to cigarettes." Mind. Blown.

 

The continued expansion of vaping is driving other industries, too – according to this release, lithium battery sales may be headed for an uptick in growth as much as 36 percent thanks to vaping. Given the widespread use of these cells in everything from flashlights to laptop battery packs to power tools, that's saying something.


We'll leave it there for now, but check back soon – news will undoubtedly keep breaking, and we'll be back to fix it.

acuity