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Vape News In Brief: July 10th, 2017 Edition

Vape News In Brief: July 10th, 2017 Edition



Welcome back to our weekly drop-in on everything vape-related that's transpiring somewhere in the world of media – diving right in:


While much of the developed world falls back on  an overly simplistic narrative that vaping should be banned pretty much everywhere smoking isn't welcomed, some businesses in the UK including coffee shops, diners, and pubs are either welcoming or specifically targeting vapers by offering a vapor-friendly public space. The good news: vape-friendly proprietors generally report that their patrons who opt to partake are conscientious enough to avoid disturbing non-vapers.


More writing on the wall: tobacco giants at home and abroad are continuing to acknowledge combustible cigarettes have no place in the rapidly approaching smoke free future. Philip Morris, the Big Tobacco behemoth behind Marlboro and other brands, even held an event called Can Britain go Smoke Free in the Next 10 Years last week. Of course, they're not only moving into vapor but hoping to push "heat not burn" technology that uses PG-soaked cigarettes to produce vapor from a handheld heating contraption, but if these multibillion-dollar multinationals, whose profits for years have lied on the back of a single product, are preparing to surrender the suggestion is the battle is nearly over.


This one's truly baffling. Even though this years-old (dating back to vaping's earliest beginnings) practice first garnered notice months ago, some of the more clueless in the press are still breathlessly reporting on the brand-spanking-new trend of "extreme vaping" - they're referring to dripping, and we have yet to see a story that acknowledges the practice has been popular since at least 2009. Dripping actually began to fall out of favor in 2015 with the introduction of new-generation sub-ohm clearomizers, years before news outlets ever picked up on it – most of these stories cite "as many as 25 percent" of vapers dripping, but in 2013 or 2014 the number was probably closer to 60 or 70 percent.


Some people, however, retain their intelligence when confronted by a keyboard. Here's a good opinion piece laying out the dangers posed by FDA's deeming regulations. We include one of these nearly every week, but just in case you're new to the vape scene or you've been under a rock for months it's worth a read, and important enough that we'll keep hammering on the points it brings to light.


Just because it's liquid doesn't mean you can vape it. A Michigan man ended up dead last week after attempting to vape fentanyl, a powerful opioid. It should be obvious, but don't vape anything that isn't e-liquid from a trusted supplier unless you're well-versed in home mixing – and even then, don't add anything stupid.


While fearmongering reports about vaping leading to increased youth smoking continue to make the rounds, it's encouraging to see more and more news outlets also taking in the big picture: both vaping and smoking among teens are at record lows. That's straight from the mouth of the FDA.


A random tidbit: Nevada, the District of Columbia, and California lead the nation in the prevalence of vaping as an alternative to smoking, or at least they tweet about it more than anywhere else.


Contradictory much? A report from UCLA researchers runs with the headline "Doctors raise vaping concerns," but the contains this tidbit from professor of medicine Holly Middlekauff: "I would not discourage a tobacco smoker from switching to e-cigarettes, but we need more research on vaping risks and how the two compare." Middlekauff of course recommends that non-smokers don't pick up a vaping habit, and suggests more research is needed (a common theme among doctors and academics hesitant to make a strong statement of fact), but the fact that one wouldn't discourage a smoker from attempting to quit using vapor products speaks volumes.


Here's an editorial from the "vaping Congressman" himself - Duncan Hunter Jr., famous for making use of his e-cig during House debates over restriction of the products. He does well laying out the case for harm reduction, pointing to the fact that more aspiring quitters turn to vapor products than any other smoking cessation tool currently available. The paper also ran a rebuttal, which accuses the industry of using flavored products as a direct effort to ensnare children (this claim has been widely debunked), the "popcorn lung" scare tactic (potentially a minor concern, but widely overblown and a topic we've dedicated much space to addressing on our blogs), and arguing that largely ineffective tools such as nicotine patches and gums should be enough for anyone who truly wants to quit.


While the American Lung Association works to demonize vaping (see the Hunter opposition piece above), the British Lung Association is teaming up with a vape supplier in an attempt to supply e-cigs to a reality show that's receiving consumer complaints about the cast lighting up on screen. What a refreshing change of pace!


That's a wrap for this week but rest assured that as news continues to break, we'll be here every Sunday to fix it!

acuity